AW2015 IJL Catwalk Trend Report

  • AW2015 IJL Catwalk Trend Report

    Adorn Insight brings you a roundup of the AW2015 jewellery catwalk trends that are set to influence consumer buying decisions next season.

    Targeted at designers, manufacturers, buyers and retailers, this report aims to give you a strategic handle on the key trends that will offer commercial resilience in a competitive market. 

    By their very nature as a showcase for design at its best, catwalks are a place where drama and overstatement are the norm. These are the looks which will be distilled into commercial collections six months down the line and as such, their role is to capture the imagination and hit the headlines, and to do so in a few short seconds.

    Catwalk jewellery is no different and whilst many – though by no means all – of the pieces that hit the AW15/16 catwalks were ‘fashion’ in sensibility, they set the tone for new directions which will most certainly impact the fine jewellery sector. From blooms to orbs, vintage updates to subcultural references, these are the trends set to make waves.

  • Diamond Blaze

    L-R: Vivienne Westwood Red Label; Holly Fulton [top]; Bora Aksu [bottom]; DSquared2

    Vintage-inspired looks hit the catwalks in an explosion of gem-encrusted dangles, drops and decorative motifs.

    At one end of the spectrum, a crystal palette of inky blacks and slate greys set a dramatic tone. Oversized crystal-embellished earrings set an old-school glam tone as swinging, sparkling surfaces caught the cameras’ flashlights at a show by DSquared2.

    In contrast, softer pastels featured at shows such as Holly Fulton, Bora Aksu and Vivienne Westwood Red Label, with Westwood’s pretty neck pieces gently subverting the classic pearl strands by twisting ombré pearls round a fan-shaped pendant.

    Interpret the look: See this as a fantastic excuse to work surface decoration into your repertoire. Craft based techniques such as filigree and granulation, as well as richly hued gemstones in unusual settings and arrangements, add wow factor to classic silhouettes.  Add a contemporary flourish by playing with scale.

  • Geo-Form

    L-R: Lyn Devon; Thom Browne; DKNY [top]; Victoria Beckham [bottom]; Alexander Wang

    Large, small, bifurcated, two-tone, solo or clustered, monochrome or multi-coloured – if one component dominated the AW15/16 catwalks, it was the orb.

    Adopting a hard-edged sensibility, designers such as Thom Browne, Lyn Devon and Alexander Wang looked to ball bearings for inspiration, winding strands of gleaming black balls around necks and wrists.

    Pearls were a popular choice for some designers, with Victoria Beckham clustering them on rippling cuffs.

    Interpret the look: The orb is timelessly chic and highly commercial so, however you introduce it, it will be a winner. Add a fresh touch to this much loved icon by mixing and matching sizes, combining different colours, graduating sizes or arranging in random clusters.

  • SEVENTIES

    L-R: Giambattista Valli [top]; Desigual [bottom left]; Balmain; Just Cavalli

    The 1970s inspired designers with looks that had the globetrotting boho at their core. Statement pieces abounded with giant faceted gems at Desigual and oversized pendants at Giambattista Valli – golden florals on slim wire chokers – and malachite, onyx and tiger's eye slices at Just Cavalli.

    Fringe – both fabric and chain – showed up again and again. Perhaps the most elegant iteration came courtesy of Balmain, who festooned a bright red, high shine, enamel choker with cascades of fine golden links.

    Interpret the look: Movement is key here. Achieve it with segmented elements, curtains of fine gauge chain on molten-look metals and silhouettes. Gems look best in chunky or rough cuts and imperfections such as bands and inclusions add visual appeal.

  • Victoriana Punk

    L-R: Jean Pierre Braganza [top]; Sass & Bide [bottom]; Sass & Bide; Vivienne Westwood Red Label

    Subcultures provide constant fodder for designers looking to inject youthful rebellion into their designs. This season saw a look emerge that was equal parts Victorian governess and vampish goth/badass punk – a mashup accompanied by jewellery constructed from leather, blackened metals and dark crystals.

    Chokers ranged from slim-line and decorated with hardware, to ultra-wide at Jean Pierre Braganza. The ubiquitous influence of Fifty Shades Of Grey manifested itself in Vivienne Westwood’s heavy metal chains and full body harnesses at Sass & Bide.

    Interpret the look: Armour-like constructions underpin this look, so focus on pieces that feature overlapping and articulated sections. Components have a hardware feel to them, so find ways to make a hero out of buckles, rivets, bolts and chains.

  • Floral Fancy

    L-R: Dries Van Noten; Maison Martin Margiela; Manish Arora

    Big, bold blooms burst onto the catwalks in a riot of colour and texture with acid green orchids at Maison Martin Margiela and glittering supersized irises at Manish Arora. Dries Van Noten paired cable-thick, darkened silver rope neck chains with sprays of feathers and petals that resembled otherworldly dahlias.

    Echoing the vintage trends seen elsewhere, stylised floral motifs – many liberally sprinkled with crystals – were a popular option.

    Interpret the look: Focus on solutions that create an impression of volume. Gently rippling edges and undulating surfaces are perfect for leaf and petal-based looks. Explore colour in the form of pavé gemstones in graduated hues, enamel embellishment, mixed golds and even colourful titanium flourishes.


    Adorn Insight is a specialised resource dedicated to providing market intelligence, data analysis and trend forecasts to the global jewellery industry. Their clients include manufacturers, designers, retailers and buyers working across the fashion to luxury fine jewellery spectrum. They also provide bespoke consultancy services to jewellery professionals seeking new opportunities for growth.

Author Jewellery Show - International Jewellery London


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