AW2014 IJL Catwalk Trend Report

  • AW2014 IJL Catwalk Trend Report

    Adorn Insight brings you a roundup of the AW2014 jewellery catwalk trends that are set to influence consumer buying decisions next season.

    Targeted at designers, manufacturers, buyers and retailers this report aims to give you a strategic handle on the key trends that will offer commercial resilience in a competitive market.

    Whilst the nature of the catwalk means that our visual references are predominately costume jewellery we have distilled our analysis to focus on the opportunities that are set to impact the global fine, designer and luxury jewellery sectors.


  • White Heat

    L-R: Matthew Williamson, Christian Dior, KTZ, Chanel, Giambattista Valli

    Although gold continues to hold sway as the metal of choice for AW2014 there was a definite shift towards silver metal, particularly on large-scale statement pieces.

    Polished, matte or textured silver metal dominated this look which ranges from delicate starry constellations at Matthew Williamson to futuristic, globular earrings at KTZ. Chunky silver chains and oversized links came out in force with heavy hitters Chanel and Dior both sending out heavy gauge chains wrapped around wrists and necks.

    Interpret the look: This is an opportunity to embrace seasonality and up your offering of white gold and platinum for the AW14 season.

  • Geo-Minimalism

    L-R: Holly Fulton, Altuzarra, Damir Doma, Tod's, Dries Van Noten, Dries Van Noten

    Graphic silhouettes lent themselves to a diverse array of eye-catching executions from simple daywear options to bolder looks for evening. Cut-out pieces - such as Deco-influenced earrings at Holly Fulton and circle-based cuffs at Dries Van Noten - affirmed the elegant appeal of outlines and frameworks as a basis for design. Silver wire worked into abstract ‘scribbles’ made for dramatic neckpieces at Altuzarra. At Dries Van Noten the same wire was used to create super minimal chokers hung with a solitary pearl. 

    Interpret the look:  Explore simple shapes and use them as a starting point by repeating and combining. Incorporate fuss-free silhouettes and remember to keep things light and delicate on the fine jewellery front.

  • Swing Time


    L-R: Chloe, Etro, Ralph Lauren, Vera Wang, Chanel, Marchesa

    Movement-filled pieces abounded on the AW14 catwalks adding drama and sass that can be channeled into more commercial options for the non-catwalking jewellery consumer. Cascades are key motif here: pearl strands knotted and dripping at Chanel; shimmering crystal cataracts at Vera Wang and elegant gold fringing on bracelets at Chloe.

    As an alternative to the theme, long chain pendants, frequently suspended pendulum-like from mid length necklaces, were a popular style.

    Interpret the look: Fringed chain and bead strands are prime components here. Lariats and long drape earrings are key silhouettes to support this look and keep things fresh.

  • Opulence

    L-R: Marchesa, Versace, KTZ, Missoni, Marani, Anna Sui

    In contrast to the pared back looks of Geo-Minimalism, Opulence is an (almost) no holds barred approach to adornment with plenty of scope for interpretation. Gold underpinned many of the catwalk looks, setting off vibrant coloured stones and richly hued crystals to striking effect.

    Adventures in texture, scale and surface detail all contributed to lavish looks that included Rococo trimmings and Medusa medallions at Versace, oversized chandelier earrings at Marchesa, fingers full of cabochon bedecked rings at Missoni and remarkable bubble-like neckwear at KTZ.

    Interpret the look: Stone encrusted jewels and big gems are a good starting point. Update your inventory with new gemstones in line with the season’s colour palette.

  • Shape

    L-R: Cynthia Rowley, Acne, Chloe, Emporio Armani, Saint Laurent, Marni 

    Triangles, circles and squares on the catwalks showed that simple shapes continue to be a key motif in jewellery. Circle-within-circle ideas appeared time and again with the likes of Marni using the idea to chic effect on rings featuring coloured discs nestled in high profile settings. Outlines cropped up again in triangular pendant earrings at Saint Laurent and Frisbee-sized silver neckpieces at Acne.

    Interpret the look: Taking a tip from the catwalks, focus more on outline and silhouette than extraneous surface detail. Celebrate clean lines and consider working up 2D shapes into 3D elements.

  • Flight

    L-R: Alberta Ferretti, Ferragamo, Rodarte, Alberta Ferretti

    Bugs, birds, butterflies, dragonflies swarmed the AW14 catwalks offering up a plethora of design potential. At Rodarte the ever-popular butterfly appeared perched daintily on ear lobes and at the end of slender silver chains. Cuffs at Ferragamo sported beetles with frayed wire wings open to expose bronzed thoraxes. Rodarte sent out classically styled butterfly pendant and earring sets in gold and silver. Alberta Ferretti looked to birds for inspiration which she worked up into cute cartoon-like avian brooches and chokers festooned with an abundance of glossy diesel-hued feathers.

    Interpret the look: Use this opportunity to introduce key motifs such as birds and butterflies and remember that abstract interpretations that allude to flight are just as important.


    Adorn Insight is a specialised resource dedicated to providing market intelligence, data analysis and trend forecasts to the global jewellery industry. Their clients include manufacturers, designers, retailers and buyers working across the fashion to luxury fine jewellery spectrum. They also provide bespoke consultancy services to jewellery professionals seeking new opportunities for growth.

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